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Without English the NBA is speechless

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Without Carl English The Nba Is Speechless

It was the 2003 NBA Draft and Carl English had invited his family to a downtown Toronto restaurant. After an amazing career at the University of Hawaii, the sharpshooter was supposed to be a late first-round pick. Everyone was waiting for David Stern to walk up to the podium and announce that an NBA team had selected English. Then, the celebration could begin. That moment never happened. The entire NBA took a pass. Twice. No team picked Carl English in the first or second round.

Two years have passed and he has just finished his season with the Florida Flame of the NBDL. There were no Sunday games on ABC, just long bus rides, half-empty stadiums, and meager paychecks. But things have never been easy for Carl English. When he was five, English lost his parents in a house fire. He went to live with his Uncle Junior and Aunt Betty in tiny Patrick’s Cove, Newfoundland. Basketball became an outlet and English would spend hours shooting on an outdoor hoop that backed onto a remote highway. “There wasn’t much else around,” laughs English. “Basketball has been my way out. My peaceful place and my life revolved around it.”

Nothing could stop basketball practice. Snow would be removed from the court with a shovel; the rain wasn’t an issue either. During the summer, he would ignore the heat and stay out on the road perfecting his moves.
His dedication and talent went mostly unnoticed until 1999. That summer, English toured the United States with a Canadian All-Star team and caught the eye of a few NCAA Division 1 schools. Baylor, Notre Dame, and Hawaii were all impressed by what they saw: a six-foot-five-inch athlete with crazy range on his jump shot. Hawaii won the bidding war and English traded the island community of Patrick’s Cove for the tropical islands of the Pacific Ocean.

With his bags packed for Hawaii, English had to overcome another family tragedy. Uncle Junior passed away on a fishing trip. A few months later, English injured his left ankle and was given a medical redshirt for his first year at the University of Hawaii. For once, basketball couldn’t be his outlet. Over the next three years, Carl English put in work and became a college basketball star. Dick Vitale loved the Canadian’s game and his Hawaii Rainmakers got their shine on in the 2001 and 2002 NCAA tournament. ESPN Magazine and USA Today both ran feature stories on English. After his junior year, the kid from rural Newfoundland declared himself eligible for the 2003 NBA Draft. English finished his collegiate career as the University of Hawaii’s seventh all-time leading scorer.

The next few months in Carl English’s basketball life make very little sense. Combo guards who can shoot usually end up being selected somewhere in the first round. Throw in his leadership skills and most thought he could have a solid NBA career. So what went wrong? How did guards like Marcus Banks, Reece Gaines, and Troy Bell get picked in the first round instead of English? How could NBA teams take European and American teenagers over a mature player such as English? Why would the Toronto Raptors pass on a Canadian with the fifty-second pick to take prospect Remon Van de Hare?

The problems started at the Chicago pre-draft workouts. English slipped out of the first round because NBA GMs thought he was too slow to play the “1” spot and too small to line up at off-guard. Without a true position, his accomplishments at Hawaii were quickly forgotten. Banks, Gaines and Bell passed English in the draft rankings and were all selected in the mid-to-late first round. These guards have all collected NBA paychecks to sit on their club’s bench.

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Kevin Garnett, Kobe Bryant, and Dirk Nowitzki have changed the way NBA teams draft players. These three players entered the league as teenagers and quickly became superstars. Teams now had to take high school kids and international players based on their potential over established NCAA stars. In English’s 2003 draft year, five high school players and 15 Europeans were selected. With the exception of first overall pick LeBron James, none of them have made any impact in the NBA.

In June of 2003, the Toronto Raptors had bigger issues than Carl English. They had just missed the playoffs for the first time in three years. The front office was taking heat for giving Michael “Yogi” Stewart millions of dollars and funding the first few years of Hakeem Olajuwon’s retirement. Coach Lenny Wilkens had just been fired. Vince Carter was struggling with injuries. Former Raptors’ GM Glen Grunwald was trying to keep the dinosaurs from going extinct and missed what a talented Canadian could bring to the club.

Two years after the 2003 draft, English can’t explain what happened. However, he insists that it’s behind him.

“I try not to think about it. I mean it was the draft. I thought I was going to go and didn’t. But there’s no use looking back on decisions I’ve made. I’ve got to go forward and try to get into the NBA. I mean, I can’t look back and say things I should have done. What if? What if this? What if that? So, I don’t spend a lot of time thinking about it. I did when it happened. I’m over it now.”

The Indiana Pacers had scouted English and invited the guard to their 2003-2004 training camp. At his first pro camp, the kid from tiny Patrick’s Cove showed that he could ball with the best players in the world. Superstar Reggie Miller even took English under his wing. Unfortunately, his NBA dream came down to numbers. The Pacers already had 16 guaranteed contracts and stuck with second-round pick James Jones instead of English.

Last September, Seattle asked English to attend their training camp. The club was loaded with perimeter players and he got cut. However, game can always recognize game and English remembers a conversation he had with Sonics’ star Ray Allen.

“I remember Ray saying this to me before I left there. He said to me that he wasn’t sure what this situation could give me. He also said, no matter what I was good enough to play at this level. No one can take that away. A lot of it is getting in the right situation at the right time.”

That right situation hasn’t come. There have only been rumors. During the 2004 season, the Raptors were apparently looking to sign English but went with Jannero Pargo and veteran Rod Strickland. He’s also been linked to New York, where former Pacers’ coach Isiah Thomas is working as the Knicks’ GM. Frustration has started to set in for English and he recently fired his agent for not returning phone calls.

Right now, there’s no Air Canada Centre or Madison Square Garden for Carl English. Last season, the NBA dream took him through Roanoke, Virginia. Other nights, his Florida Flame played in rural Alabama. Hopefully, an NBA scout or GM will notice the 14 points per game scoring average and 46% shooting from beyond the arc. It may never happen. Then again, things have never been easy for Carl English.

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The 8th Wonder Of The Celtics

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The 8th Wonder Of The Celtics
Pieces Of 8...

Shimmy shimmy ya, shimmy yam, shimmy yay. Give Kemba Walker, Antoine Walker’s number and he’ll take it away.

Why you shaking that shimmy like that? Sometime between the big three of Boston Celtics legend Larry Bird’s shot and the big-three of Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen formed by Paul Pierce (sucks…just kidding), his former dynamic duo partner in the age of Shaq and Kobe, Antoine Walker had a decent one on him from downtown. Which he’d shake and bake before breaking out that signature dance. Stepping out after cutting a rug against his opponent like leaving broken nail patches in that old splintered parquet floor in the garden. As the one/two punch of ‘toine and P-Double really were the truth. I’ll always remember the time these two and the rest of the Celtics led by Horry like (I love Waltah) super microwave sub off the bench Walt McCarty took the Sixers to the statistics with a box score barrage of threes. Even Mark Bryant was getting them (old Mamba). Everyone was shaking the shimmy, like Walker this way. A certified classic Celtics legend.

Antoine Walker Boston Celtics Shimmy
Antoine Walker Boston Celtics Shimmy

“And just then, the highway opened up-right at the junction, right at that spot on the highway where you see the skyline of Boston, and you go, “What!?” Because it suddenly goes from trees, woods, and crickets to cars flashing by and skyscrapers and apartment buildings…Just at that moment, I went “Oh, s***, the city!” That’s what Boston boy, Aerosmith legendary lead singer Steven Tyler says about entering (ha, ha) his New England home. And from a guy whose got there from New York on more Peter Pan and Greyhound’s than Tinkerbell and Santa’s Little Helper, trust me the ‘Dude Looks Like A Lady’ singer is right about this moment of sweet emotion. Try and catch a shot on your smartphones all you like (believe me…I’ve tried and failed), but you won’t want to miss a thing. Now I’m sure Kemba Walker’s journey to the city will be a lot more glamorous than crying whilst binge watch episodes of the latest ‘Stranger Things’ series on a coach trip. But he’ll get plenty of chances to see this skyline envelope him in all its epic, awe and scribe inspiring feats when he rides the team bus.

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Because now after Kyrie Irving left the opposite way for no sleep on the drive to Brooklyn with Kevin Durant, the city is Kemba’s after he said goodbye to Charlotte and the Hornets nest.

A little disrespectful of a heartfelt Nike commercial, but then again so is Kyrie ghosting the Celtics like Peter Parker’s Spider-Man did Nick Fury ‘Far From Home’.

In the words of Samuel L. Jackson, “that’s some bull####!”

Kanter’s banter is the off-season Iverson step over of the Summer. And him playing a bunch of Boston kids on the playground full court in his full uniform is the hallmark, heartfelt moment of the year. But keeping the uniform on and sticking with numbers, the new star of the show Kemba Walker hopes to be the new eighth wonder of Boston’s world.

Now although he got legend Antoine Walker’s blessing, I originally believed that Boston should have already raised this to the rafters with a shimmy for their original employee number 8. The biggest wonder of that digit since the Black Mamba in the same ’96 draft class of its own. Even if Kemba hilariously tells us that there wasn’t any other numbers left with the amount of legends that have retired with the NBA’s most storied franchise (Walker’s old 15 obviously being retired for Tom Heinsohn). Up in the banner ceiling with all that dust and Red cigar billowing smoke. But then this writer realized that it was probably just jet-lag after his Beantown trip last week, or the Laker fan in me trying to pick fault with a Boston I love more than most purple and gold (in this garden every Batman need his Joker who he really, truly loves madly, deeply (savage)) talking.

I’m actuality it’s really a beautiful homage. They both have the same last name Martha. Now if Kemba unlike Kyrie makes sure that no one else ever wears this number in a fitting moment they could retire both players together, like their Laker rivals may do with LeBron and AD once the 23 is passed next year, as the King looks to have more jerseys retired in Hollywood than Kobe.

Antoine and Kemba together forever.

Walker this way.

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MVP Brandon Clarke dominates, leads Grizzlies to 2019 NBA Summer League Title

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2019 Las Vegas Summer League Memphis Grizzlies V Minnesota Timberwolves

Canadian Brandon Clarke, the 21st pick of the 2019 Draft dominated the NBA’s annual summer showcase — becoming the first player to take home both tournament and championship game most valuable player honors with a dominant 15 points, 16 rebounds double-double. The No. 8 Memphis Grizzlies the Minnesota Timberwolves 95-92 to win the 2019 NBA Summer League championship.

The former Gonzaga standout added 4 assists, 3 blocks and a steal in 25 minutes.

Canadian Basketball Player Brandon Clarke 2019 Nba Summer League MVP
Canadian Basketball Player Brandon Clarke 2019 NBA Summer League MVP

In six games of summer league action, Clark averaged 14.7 points, 9.8 rebounds, 2 assists and 1.8 blocks per game. The Vancouver native shot 55% from the field and becomes the first ever Canadian to win MVP at the NBA Summer League.

Clarke was also named to the first-team all-NBA Summer League team. Other standouts included fellow Canadians Nickeil Alexander-Walker who joined Clarke on the first-team. Toronto Raptors forward Chris Boucher was named to the second-team.

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