Connect with us

FIBA

Jermaine Anderson is Canada’s Mr. Indispensable

Published

on

If anyone is looking for a true hero of Canadian basketball in recent times, they should look in the direction of the unheralded Jermaine Anderson.

He is, perhaps, consigned to a national team career of anonymity because fans and the scribes will always remember the man who played point guard before him.

How many times, even after playing well in big wins for Canada, has Anderson heard Steve Nash’s name?

It even happened after Anderson’s finest hour in a Canada jersey last summer at the FIBA Americas Championship.

Anderson had led all scorers with 21 points and fired the Canadians to an 80-76 upset of the Dominicans, a victory that clinched a spot at the FIBA World Championship.

Yet for one reporter, the question had to be asked of Canada coach Leo Rautins.

Will Steve Nash return and play in Turkey?

“Steve Nash has had an open invitation,” Rautins said.

“Anytime he says he’d like to play for Canada, the door is wide open and we’d love to have him.

“But I don’t want to use this opportunity here to talk about Steve. I’d rather talk about Jermaine Anderson, who made the plays, who helped this team get to the World Championship.

“Let’s not forget about who we have.”

Evolution of a point guard

Anderson is 27 and hails from Toronto.

He played college basketball at Fordham University in New York before embarking on a professional career that has seen him compete in Germany, Poland and this season with Cedevita in Zagreb, Croatia.

While Nash plays in the NBA, Anderson toils in the EuroChallenge and the Adriatic League.

Nash seems to have closed the door on his Canada career, but for Anderson it’s the exact opposite.

“Every summer I come out is like a blessing to me,” he said to FIBA.Com, “to have this opportunity and to learn the position as I go.

“I was not a natural point guard.

“Each summer I had to get better, adjust to the international game – the fact that I’m here, I’m very thankful.”

Rautins has marveled at Anderson’s ability to grow into the playmaker position.

“Jermaine’s been great,” Rautins said to FIBA.com.

“He was a shooting guard that became a one for us.

“Every year, he’s like a sponge.”

Anderson’s been a great example for the young players.

“He’ll do whatever it takes,” Rautins said.

“He wants to get better.

“I have nothing to say but great things about him.

“Every summer he is better, smarter.

“He’s a great shooter. I’ll never say no to a shot he takes because he takes good shots and makes them.

“He tries to do all the things a point guard does but I don’t want him to forget who he is, and he can be a great shooter.”

Must Read:  Andrew Wiggins, Trey Lyles, Tyler Ennis & Jabari Craig headline stacked 2013 Canadian Jr. National Team

The wins that matter

There was unbridled joy for all of the teams that won Quarter-Finals last summer in San Juan.

It meant the pressure was off.

The number one goal had been to reach Turkey and for those sides that reached the semis, it was mission accomplished.

During last summer’s tournament, when Canada were struggling and not looking like a team that might reach Turkey, someone told Anderson to keep his chin up, that he’d done well on numerous occasions for Canada.

“I had some great games,” Anderson said, “but until you get to an Olympics or a World Championship, you’ve done nothing in my eyes internationally.”

Anderson thought Canada could have reached the Beijing Games but they didn’t play well enough at the 2008 FIBA Olympic Qualifying Tournament.

Instead, Croatia, Greece and Germany took the three qualifying spots and advanced to China.

Reaching the FIBA World Championship in Turkey looked even harder when the Dominican Republic showed up in San Juan with NBA players Al Horford, Francisco Garcia and Charlie Villanueva.

Everyone assumed they would join Argentina, Brazil and Puerto Rico as the four sides to advance to Turkey.

Anderson had other ideas.

In the four-point triumph over the Dominicans in the last eight, he buried five of eight shots from long range.

He also had five assists in the game.

“He made some unbelievable plays against the Dominican Republic in the Quarter-Finals,” Rautins said.

Count your blessings

Anderson is in the prime of his career.

He says that the game has enriched his life.

“It’s opened up so many doors,” he said.

“It’s life. Besides family and God, basketball has done so much for me. I just love the game, love the opportunity to play for my country and hope to have the opportunity as long as I can.”

This summer, Anderson and Canada will go up against Spain, France, Lithuania, Lebanon and New Zealand in Group D of the FIBA World Championship.

Some will dismiss Canada’s chances, but the team has learned how to fight.

Rautins likes to go back and think about the hard times.

“At the world qualifiers, when we got eliminated,” Rautins said, “Rock (Anderson) said to me he had been watching Germany play on TV and said it took them 12 years to get there (to the Olympics) with Dirk Nowitzki.

“He said, ‘Coach, we’re not going to give up. We’re going to get there.”

He was right.

Via Fiba.com

FIBA

Young Canadian squad shapes FIBA Basketball World Cup 2019 Americas Qualifiers

Published

on

Xavier Rathan Mayes Canada Vs Argentina

For the past twenty-plus (20) years starving Canadian basketball fans across the country have asked for more International sanctioned games on home soil.

Finally, it looks like those requests are materializing.

With the upcoming kick-off to the newly formatted road to the FIBA Basketball World Cup, the 2019 Americas Qualifiers taking place in Halifax, Nova Scotia will satisfy and quench the thirst of long-time East coast supporters of the National game.

A young, 25th-ranked Canadian squad will take on 59th ranked Bahamas, in a important Group D qualify game at the Scotiabank Centre.

Led by former number one pick of the 2013 NBA Draft, Anthony Bennett (Northern Arizona, G-League), the roster features a strong young crop of former Usports All-Canadians and NCAA Division I standouts. Additionally, a further testimony to the growth of Canadian University Basketball, Ryerson Rams head coach Roy Rana, headlines the coaching staff alongside Carleton Ravens coach Dave Smart.

Point guard duties will be handled by Olivier Hanlan, Phil Scrubb and Kaza Kajami-Keane. The latter two having won multiple Usports basketball championships under the tutelage of Smart. Three-point specialist Brady Heslip and along side confident Xavier Rathan-Mayes will look to fill it up for the outside. The front court will anchored by 6’8″ Anthony Bennett, Thomas Scrubb, (another Ravens All-Canadian) and former Acadia Axemen 6’10” Owen Klassen (Kingston, ON).

Overall the roster looks solid, given the lack of availability of Canada’s top talent due to changes in the qualifying format, and the NBA’s willingness to move aside and grant FIBA the release of its players, regardless of nationality for the World Cup qualifying periods.

Must Read:  Steve Nash feature- The Winter Soldier

Placed in Group D alongside Virgin Islands, Bahamas and Dominican Republic. The young Canadians will play a home and away series against each team. After the Bahamas game, Canada will fly out to the Dominican Republic for a stern road test on November 28, 2017 to wrap up the opening qualifying window.  The second qualifier will take in late February with Canada once again hitting the road for games against the Virgin Islands and the Bahamas. The third qualifying window will see Canada host two more games on home soil on June 29 and July 2, 2018.

Canada is coming off a mediocre performance at the FIBA Americup dropping games to Virgin Islands 83-71, Argentina 92-86 with its only win against a tough Venezuela 75-66 team that denied the Canadians an Olympics appearance in Rio 2016.

Joel Anthony

Centre

6’9″

Montreal, QC Free Agent
Anthony Bennett

Forward

6’8″

Toronto, ON Northern Arizona Suns (G-League)
Grandy Glaze

Centre

6’7″

Toronto, ON St. John’s Edge (NBL Canada)
Olivier Hanlan

Guard

6’4″

Aylmer, QC Austin Spurs (G-League)
Brady Heslip

Guard

6’2″

Burlington, ON Trabzonspor (Turkey)
Kaza Kajami-Keane

Guard

6’1″

Ajax, ON Raptors 905 (G-League)
Owen Klassen

Centre

6’10”

Kingston, ON PAOK (Greece)
Dyshawn Pierre

Forward

6’6″

Whitby, ON Banco di Srd (Italy)
Xavier Rathan-Mayes

Guard

6’4″

Scarborough, ON Westchester Knicks (G-League)
Phil Scrubb

Guard

6’3″

Richmond, B.C. Fraport SKY (Germany)
Thomas Scrubb

Forward

6’6″

Richmond, B.C. Scandone AV (Italy)
Marc Trasolini

Centre

6’9″

Vancouver, B.C. Hokkaido L. (Japan)
Continue Reading

FIBA

Canadian Rowan Barrett Jr. Insane 38 points versus USA

Published

on

Canadian Rowan Barrett Jr. 38 Points Versus USA

Canadian Guard Rowan Barrett Jr. goes off for an insane 38 points versus USA at the 2017 FIBA U19 World Cup in Cairo Egypt. Canada stunned the USA 99-87 to advance to Gold Medal game.

Continue Reading

FIBA

Angola’s Silvio de Sousa beastly 27 points, 21 rebounds against Korea

Published

on

Angola Silvio Sousa Dominates Korea 2017 FIBA U 19 World Cup
Photo: FIBA

Angola’s 18-year old Silvio de Sousa (6’9″, 240lbs) power forward is one of the rising stars of Angolan and African Basketball.

In his last FIBA U19 game in Cairo, De Sousa beasted Korea with 27 points and 21 rebounds as Angola closed-out the 2017 World Cup with a 55-53 win.

De Sousa, a bruising forward is the best polished Angolan Basketball player ever at this age and averaged a double-double at the 2017 FIBA U19 World Cup in Egypt, Cairo with 17.3 points per game (3rd), 13.1 rebounds (1st), 2.1 assists and 1.4 steals.

The 2018 IMG Academy (Bradenton, Florida) four star recruit holds NCAA Basketball Division I offers from Florida, Louisville, Maryland, LSU and many others and currently represents Angola’s best chance at a future first round and potential NBA pick.

Continue Reading

Buzzing